Kamala Varadarajan

In a Flash: Paly’s Diverse Interpretations of Street Photography

PARIS, FRANCE
This image of two hunched over Parisians conversing on a public bench captures a relaxed, candid moment between the two men. Their casual composures evoke an easygoing mood and their similar clothing and hair create a reflection across the middle. The grainy film filter adds a vintage touch to the shot, eliciting a nostalgic feeling. Photo by Maraleis Sinton, senior

From typical urban and rural life to the electric atmosphere of impassioned activist marches, student street photographers capture fleeting moments that are often overlooked. These candid photos usually feature people in city streets, but this style is highly flexible and up to the photographer’s interpretation. Street photography lends itself to incorporating a variety of techniques,such as film, lens blur and changing the shutter speed to transform a mundane subject into art. In this collection,several Palo Alto High School student photographers showcase their own take on street photography with shots from around the world.

NEW YORK CITY, NY
The graininess of the film photo
adds character to shot, while the
contrasting black and white scheme draws attention to the shadows and highlights. The photo depicts a bustling urban street in New York City, with crowds of people passing by and a road full of cars. Amid the chaos, it focuses on two physically similar men, identically dressed, one gesturing, one on a cell phone. The juxtaposition of the two men effectively underscores a mundane part of their day on the job. Photo by Ryan Gwyn, senior
TOKYO, JAPAN
This image of locals eating at a counter highlights a routine aspect of their lives, but the composition brings more meaning to it. The unconventional shot from behind is offset by the repeated pattern of three: the three diners, the three lit lanterns, and the horizontal lines dividing the composition into thirds. The various blue, white and yellow hues contrast with the bold-type Japanese characters on the banner. Photo by Natalie Schilling, junior